Ecommerce SEO Blog

Keyword Research and Analysis for eCommerce – Part 1

In the first series we looked at the SEO considerations behind ecommerce website architecture. During the next articles I will detail the keyword research and analysis process for ecommerce websites. In the first part I will briefly talk about keyword data collection and personas. While SEO is the abbreviation for “search engine optimization”, SEO experts don’t actually improve how search engines work; SEO optimize websites for search engines . And because the main purpose of search engines is to be helpful to the people who use them, SEO would be better thought of as optimizing a website for users (to a certain extent SEO overlaps with UI and usability) AND for search engines. The search trifecta includes three entities: The user The search engine The website When performing keyword research, SEOs very often skip the user and jump straight to the search engine. This series describes what I believe is a better long-term approach to keyword research: start with the user, then move to the website, and finally consider the search engine.

  • Posted by  Traian
  • ecommerce seo, Keyword Research
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Ecommerce Website Architecture and SEO – Part 4

This is the fourth part of the Site Architecture for e-Commerce series. I recommend reading part one, two and three. All ecommerce websites will have primary navigation (aka global navigation or main navigation), secondary navigation (aka local navigation) and contextual navigation. Another form of navigation specific to ecommerce websites is faceted navigation – this form of navigation is present only on complex ecommerce websites. Primary and secondary navigation Primary navigation is the easiest type for most users to identify. It allows direct access to the website’s hierarchy and is present on almost all pages. Primary navigation represents all of the top-level categories. It will be difficult for Kohl’s to rank for top-level category keywords (e.g., Home, Bed & Bath, Furniture, Outerwear, etc.), since they will have to compete with niche-specific websites that are laser-focused on one particular segment—for example, a company that sells only furniture. However, it’s not impossible for Kohl’s to achieve good rankings, but it will require significant work, including onsite SEO and quality back link development.

  • Posted by  Traian
  • Website Architecture
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Ecommerce Website Architecture and SEO – Part 3

This is the third part of the Site Architecture for e-Commerce series. I recommend reading part one and two first. As I mentioned at the end of part two of the series, you can create ecommerce silos with directories or with internal linking: Directories You create the hierarchy using user research and testing (done by information architects), keyword analysis and research, and web traffic analysis. Your silos will be the directories in the URLs. Whenever possible, have a directory hierarchy. Internal links With internal linking you can create virtual silos, as pages in the same silo don’t need to be placed under the same directory. You achieve virtual silos by controlling internal links in such a way that search engine robots only find links to the pages in the same silo. This is a very similar concept to bot herding[i] or PageRank sculpting[ii] (with subtle differences in meaning and application).

  • Posted by  Traian
  • Internal Linking, Website Architecture
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Ecommerce Website Architecture and SEO – Part 2

This is the second part of the site architecture for ecommerce series. I recommend reading part one first. The concept of flat architecture In good, flat architecture, deep pages (pages at the lower levels of the website hierarchy—usually the product detail pages) are accessible to users and search engine bots within a balanced number of clicks (not too many, but also not too few). The opposite of flat architecture is the so-called deep architecture[i], which looks like this: Let’s use math to illustrate the concept behind flat architecture: At level 0 (home page), you link to 100 category pages; 100^1 = 100 pages linked. At each page in level 1 (category), you link to 100 subcategory pages; 100^2 = 10,000 subcategory URLs. At each page in level 2 (subcategory), you link to 100 product pages; 100^3 = one million product page URLs.

  • Posted by  Traian
  • Internal Linking, Website Architecture
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Ecommerce Website Architecture and SEO – Part 1

During the next few articles we will explore the concepts behind building optimized ecommerce website architectures. I will detail the concept in several articles, so please make sure you read all of them in order to get a good grasp of the concept. This is part one. Having a great website architecture means making products and categories findable on your website so that users and search engines can reach them as easily as possible. There are two concepts search engine optimizers (SEOs) should be aware of in relationship to site architecture (SA):

  • Posted by  Traian
  • Website Architecture
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Introduction to the Ecommerce SEO blog

This blog aims at becoming the most exhaustive ecommerce SEO resource on the web. I will regularly publish articles on it, so make sure you come back often. A brief introduction to ecommerce Ecommerce appeared in its basic form (electronic business transactions) in the late 1970s.[1] At that time such transactions happened at the B2B level, mostly for invoices and purchase orders. B2C ecommerce as we now know it started around 1994, after the launch of the Netscape browser. By 2013 ecommerce had boomed to $261 billion in the US alone.[2] In 2014 China’s ecommerce is expected to grow 64%, with sales around $1.5 trillion.

  • Posted by  Traian
  • Introduction
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